1893 $10 (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Head $10 1838-1907

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65+

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PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65

PCGS MS65

PCGS #:
8725
Designer:
Christian Gobrecht
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
26.80 millimeters
Weight:
16.70 grams
Mintage:
1,840,840
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 40,000 R-2.6 112 / 117 TIE 178 / 183 TIE
60 or Better 29,250 R-2.7 93 / 117 TIE 146 / 183 TIE
65 or Better 6 R-9.7 26 / 117 TIE 35 / 183 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 40,000
60 or Better 29,250
65 or Better 6
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-2.6
60 or Better R-2.7
65 or Better R-9.7
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 112 / 117 TIE
60 or Better 93 / 117 TIE
65 or Better 26 / 117 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 178 / 183 TIE
60 or Better 146 / 183 TIE
65 or Better 35 / 183 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS65+ PCGS grade

David Hall Collection - Bob R. Simpson Collection

1 MS65 PCGS grade

Heritage 2/2012:4952, $9,775

1 MS65 PCGS grade

Heritage 5/2012:5153, $7,475

1 MS65 PCGS grade
1 MS65 PCGS grade
6 MS64+ PCGS grade
6 MS64+ PCGS grade
6 MS64+ PCGS grade
6 MS64+ PCGS grade
#1 MS65+ PCGS grade

David Hall Collection - Bob R. Simpson Collection

#1 MS65 PCGS grade

Heritage 2/2012:4952, $9,775

#1 MS65 PCGS grade

Heritage 5/2012:5153, $7,475

#1 MS65 PCGS grade
#1 MS65 PCGS grade
#6 MS64+ PCGS grade
#6 MS64+ PCGS grade
#6 MS64+ PCGS grade
#6 MS64+ PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

The 1893 $10 has the dubious distinction of having the largest PCGS-certified population of any date in the entire 10 Liberty series (although the 1894 $10 is almost as plentiful). This was one of the dates exported in large quantities to European central banks by the United States government decades ago. Dealers began re-importing them back into America beginning in the late 1970's and 1980s, and the supply has been seemingly inexhaustible.

One might expect a large number of Gems from such a large population, but such is not the case. Rather, the overall quality of this date is generally poor, with the vast majority of survivors appearing in MS61 and MS62, suggesting excessive handling and movement of the bags in which the coins were stored. Thus, out of a population of over 17,000 PCGS-certified Mint State examples, only four have earned the MS65 grade