1828 25C (Proof)

Series: Capped Bust Quarters 1820-1838

PCGS PR65

PCGS PR65

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PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

PCGS #:
5375
Designer:
John Reich
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
27.50 millimeters
Weight:
6.74 grams
Mintage:
12
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
89.2% Silver, 10.8% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 4 R-9.8 5 / 9 TIE 8 / 16 TIE
60 or Better 4 R-9.8 5 / 9 TIE 8 / 16 TIE
65 or Better 3 R-9.8 7 / 9 13 / 16
Survival Estimate
All Grades 4
60 or Better 4
65 or Better 3
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-9.8
60 or Better R-9.8
65 or Better R-9.8
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 5 / 9 TIE
60 or Better 5 / 9 TIE
65 or Better 7 / 9
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 8 / 16 TIE
60 or Better 8 / 16 TIE
65 or Better 13 / 16

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR65 PCGS grade

Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Stamp & Coin 6/1890:981 - Thomas Cleneay Collection - S.H. & H. Chapman 12/1890:1340 - Dr. Christian Allenburger Collection - B. Max Mehl 3/1948:842 - T. James Clarke Collection - New Netherlands 1956:1514 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Stack's 2/1965:1630 - RARCOA “Auction ‘82” ?/1982:713 - R.W.M., Sr. - Heritage 8/1996:7065 - Long Beach Connoisseur Collection - Bowers & Merena 8/1999:132, $28,750 - Stack's 3/2011:1572 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Heritage 6/2014:30358, $82,250 - Heritage 1/2015:4085, not sold - Stack's/Bowers 8/2015:10075, $99,875

1 PR65 PCGS grade

Heritage 4/2016:4614, $64,625

1 PR65 estimated grade

John Jay Pittman Collection - David Akers 5/1998:1284, $60,500 - Grand Traverse Heritage - Bowers & Merena 2/2007:284, $70,725

4 PR64 PCGS grade

Thomas S. Chalkley Collection - Superior 10/1990:2564, $41,800 - Silbermünzen Collection - Heritage 5/2008:307, $63,250

4 PR64 PCGS grade

Coinberts Proofs

6 PR63 estimated grade
6 PR63 estimated grade
6 PR63 estimated grade
9 PR60 estimated grade
#1 PR65 PCGS grade

Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Stamp & Coin 6/1890:981 - Thomas Cleneay Collection - S.H. & H. Chapman 12/1890:1340 - Dr. Christian Allenburger Collection - B. Max Mehl 3/1948:842 - T. James Clarke Collection - New Netherlands 1956:1514 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Stack's 2/1965:1630 - RARCOA “Auction ‘82” ?/1982:713 - R.W.M., Sr. - Heritage 8/1996:7065 - Long Beach Connoisseur Collection - Bowers & Merena 8/1999:132, $28,750 - Stack's 3/2011:1572 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Heritage 6/2014:30358, $82,250 - Heritage 1/2015:4085, not sold - Stack's/Bowers 8/2015:10075, $99,875

#1 PR65 PCGS grade

Heritage 4/2016:4614, $64,625

#1 PR65 estimated grade

John Jay Pittman Collection - David Akers 5/1998:1284, $60,500 - Grand Traverse Heritage - Bowers & Merena 2/2007:284, $70,725

#4 PR64 PCGS grade

Thomas S. Chalkley Collection - Superior 10/1990:2564, $41,800 - Silbermünzen Collection - Heritage 5/2008:307, $63,250

#4 PR64 PCGS grade

Coinberts Proofs

#6 PR63 estimated grade
#6 PR63 estimated grade
#6 PR63 estimated grade
#9 PR60 estimated grade
Ron Guth:

Proof 1828 Quarter Dollars are extremely rare. We know of six different Proofs of the Browning 4 variety, including one example in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution. Steve Tompkins described a single Proof Browning 1 and Rea et al list a Proof-60 example of the Browning 2 variety (though it is questionable if that coin would stand up to today's standards and requirements for a true Proof). Thus, the maximum number of Proof 1828 Quarters stands at eight examples, though the true number of Proofs is more likely seven.

Virtually all of the Proof 1828 Quarters are PR64 or better. John Jay Pittman's "Very Choice Proof" (now in an NGC PR66 holder) appears to be the finest. Curiously, a couple of the coins have similar color and toning patterns, indicating that they may have been stored together for some time.