PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1857 $3 (Regular Strike)

Series: Indian Princess $3 1854-1889

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS64+

PCGS MS64+

PCGS #:
7976
Designer:
James Barton Longacre
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
20.50 millimeters
Weight:
5.02 grams
Mintage:
20,891
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 1,250 R-4.9 29 / 41 TIE 29 / 41 TIE
60 or Better 150 R-7.5 25 / 41 TIE 25 / 41 TIE
65 or Better 2 R-9.9 6 / 41 TIE 6 / 41 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 1,250
60 or Better 150
65 or Better 2
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-4.9
60 or Better R-7.5
65 or Better R-9.9
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 29 / 41 TIE
60 or Better 25 / 41 TIE
65 or Better 6 / 41 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 29 / 41 TIE
60 or Better 25 / 41 TIE
65 or Better 6 / 41 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade

Simpson Collection

2 MS65+ PCGS grade

Great Lakes Collection

3 MS65 PCGS grade
3 MS65 estimated grade
5 MS64 PCGS grade  
	PCGS #7976 (MS) 64

College Collection, Part Two - Heritage 8/2015:4318, $14,100

5 MS64 PCGS grade
5 MS64 PCGS grade
5 MS64 PCGS grade
5 MS64 PCGS grade
5 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade

Simpson Collection

#2 MS65+ PCGS grade

Great Lakes Collection

#3 MS65 PCGS grade
#3 MS65 estimated grade
 
	PCGS #7976 (MS) 64 
#5 MS64 PCGS grade

College Collection, Part Two - Heritage 8/2015:4318, $14,100

#5 MS64 PCGS grade
#5 MS64 PCGS grade
#5 MS64 PCGS grade
#5 MS64 PCGS grade
#5 MS64 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

David Akers based his analysis of gold coins on the number of times they appeared at auction and they grades in which they were listed. Let's compare his findings with what we know from the current PCGS Population Report listings.

It turns out the 1857 is considerably rarer overall than the 1854-O, and the 1855 turned out to be twice as common as the 1857. Akers' was spot on in comparing the overall rarity of the 1857 to the 1856, and he correctly noted that both the 1854-O and the 1856 were much more difficult to locate in Mint State. The date that "behaves" the closest to the 1857 is actually the 1859 (which has a much lower mintage).

The 1857 $3 appears most frequently in MS63. MS64 examples are rare and anything MS65 or better is extremely rare. The finest example is a PCGS MS66 in the Simpson Collection.

David Akers (1975/88): The 1857 is similar in mintage, overall rarity, and number of auction appearances to the 1854-O and 1856. Most available specimens are well circulated and full mint state examples are rare, more so than the recently touted 1855 or any of the low mintage dates from 1879 to 1889, all of which generally come quite often choice when they are available at all. Some decpetive counterfeits of this year exist. They have the lustrous, unmarked surfaces of a high grade piece, but they lack the sharpness and detail of a genuine specimen. (Unlike the 1856, most 1857's are sharply struck.)