1896 5C J-1772 (Proof)

Series: Patterns - PR

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR62

PCGS PR62

PCGS PR61

PCGS PR61

PCGS #:
62226
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR64 PCGS grade
1 PR64 PCGS grade
1 PR64 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR63 PCGS grade
10 PR62 PCGS grade
#1 PR64 PCGS grade
#1 PR64 PCGS grade
#1 PR64 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR63 PCGS grade
#10 PR62 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1896, the statutory limit for the life of the Liberty Nickel had not yet expired nor was it due to expire until 1908. So, why was a new design tested in 1896? In actuality, the 1896 Pattern Nickels were made to test a variety of different alloys as possible replacements for the 75% copper/25% Nickel combination then in use. Judd-1772 contains mostly aluminum, which was found to be too soft and not durable enough for circulating coins. Supposedly, ten examples were struck in fifteen different alloys, but this report is contradicted by the hundreds of pieces that were sold out of William Woodin's estate after 1934. In addition, the PCGS Population Report lists 16 examples (as of November 2013), so it is likely that many more exist which have not yet been graded.

Many J-1772 pattern coins show corrosion from poor storage. None have been graded above PCGS PR64.