PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1925 $20 (Regular Strike)

Series: St. Gaudens $20 1907-1933

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS #:
9180
Designer:
Augustus Saint Gaudens
Edge:
Lettered
Diameter:
34.00 millimeters
Weight:
33.40 grams
Mintage:
2,831,750
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Die Varieties

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Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 241,666 R-1.8 45 / 49 TIE 49 / 54 TIE
60 or Better 215,000 R-1.8 46 / 49 50 / 54
65 or Better 27,500 R-2.7 46 / 49 50 / 54
Survival Estimate
All Grades 241,666
60 or Better 215,000
65 or Better 27,500
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-1.8
60 or Better R-1.8
65 or Better R-2.7
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 45 / 49 TIE
60 or Better 46 / 49
65 or Better 46 / 49
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 49 / 54 TIE
60 or Better 50 / 54
65 or Better 50 / 54

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade

Simpson Collection

1 MS67 PCGS grade

Dr. Steven Duckor collection

1 MS67 PCGS grade

Bella Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
7 MS66+ PCGS grade
7 MS66+ PCGS grade
7 MS66+ PCGS grade
7 MS66+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade

Simpson Collection

#1 MS67 PCGS grade

Dr. Steven Duckor collection

#1 MS67 PCGS grade

Bella Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#7 MS66+ PCGS grade
#7 MS66+ PCGS grade
#7 MS66+ PCGS grade
#7 MS66+ PCGS grade
David Akers (1975/88):

The 1925 is a very common issue that is readily available in quantity in all Mint State grades up to and including MS-64. Gems are also available with regularity, and there are some specimens that easily grade MS-67 or better. As a date, this is often lumped together with the likes of 1924, 1927 and 1928 but it is much more rare than those issues, and the 1923-D as well, in all Mint State grades and especially in gem condition. Other specialists have indicated that the 1925 is much more rare than the 1926 in gem condition but my experience is just the opposite. I find gems of 1926 to be considerably more rare than those of 1925.

The 1925 is nearly always very sharply struck. The lustre and color on most specimens is typically very good to excellent. All specimens are frosty. Although the color varies rather widely, most specimens are in the orange or rose colored gold category. Many examples also have appealing greenish gold iridescence or highlights. Reddish or orange copper stains are not unusual on this issue.